The Curious Case of APS's Special Education Survey: Part 2

Let's pick up our tale where we left off. Which is only fitting given the Albuquerque Journal has done so as well, nearly two weeks after we broke the story. Readers will continue to find original information and reporting right here at your home for all things education in New Mexico. Meanwhile, imitation is the highest form of flattery.

As I dug through thousands of pages of APS/ATF messages received through a public records request, an interesting thread related to this survey proposal emerged.

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The Curious Case of APS's Special Education Survey: Part 1

On Friday, June 29th I pressed send on an email that gave me great anxiety. I knew receipt of this request would sound alarms and place me in the bullseye (again) of some of the most powerful leaders in the state.

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Answering Yazzie: What Does A Sufficient Education Look Like?

Yazzie is an opportunity to take what we know works and scale that up. Knowing what works, and what doesn’t, requires statewide data that tells us how students, teachers, and schools are performing. And those who can't see a way to work together and evolve forward should step aside for those of us willing and ready.

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New Mexico's 2018 PARCC News Roundup

Last Thursday, New Mexico's 2018 results on the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) assessment came rolling in earlier than ever before. The results are promising, though highlight how much progress we have yet to go.

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A Brief History of Education in New Mexico in Tweets

Over the past month I've been digging into the history of public education in New Mexico and Albuquerque. Thanks in large part to the impressive work of Ann Piper in Education in Albuquerque, I tweeted out some of the most interesting tidbits.

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Enough is Enough APS. We All Deserve Better.

by Seth Saavedra │Thursday, May 17th, 2018


The war of words rages on in Albuquerque over the New Mexico Public Education Department's attempts to improve three APS campuses.

The three elementary schools in question are Hawthorne, Los Padillas, and Whittier.

 
 

Hawthorne and Whittier are the only two schools in New Mexico that've earned six consecutive F grades in a row. Los Padillas has received five consecutive Fs.

Last month, after months of back and forth, improvement plans for Los Padillas and Whittier received conditional approval from NMPED. Read the approval letters here. Meanwhile, Hawthorne must "champion and provide choice", meaning APS must inform all parents of nearby school options and support students who need transferring.

These are reasonable and logical responses to schools that have underserved students and teachers for the better part of a decade. Right?

Not if you ask leadership of APS or the Albuquerque Teachers Federation (ATF). Their responses have been apoplectic and centered on damaged egos instead of the best interests of all teachers, students, and families.

In what world, besides the echo chamber of disconnected leaders, is ensuring parents are aware of all their schooling options a bad thing?

APS Board President David Peercy (an engineer by trade) doesn’t see any problems with the schools. Barbara Peterson - board member for district four which includes Hawthorne Elementary, retired APS teacher, and former ATF political coordinator - doesn't either. And, as a retired APS teacher and ATF darling, Sen. Mimi Stewart only finds issues with school grades, not schools themselves.

I can’t make this stuff up. The closer one looks, the more this appears to be a concerted effort by a retired old guard seeking to preserve a system that maintains their lifestyles at the expense of our most vulnerable communities. When our leaders have more allegiance to school buildings than the teachers and students in them, we've lost our way.

As a "minority-majority" state, this is also a reminder of how important diversity - in age, experience, and race/ethnicity - is in making decisions for students of color. When our leaders don't share backgrounds with our students we get disconnected, ungrounded viewpoints like these.

According to an email sent out by ATF President Ellen Bernstein - who's been in the position for 22+ years - the apocalypse is nigh:

 
 

ATF is also listed as the creator of a Facebook group named "Save Hawthorne Elementary School" which continues to simultaneously misinform parents and tout changes coming to the school.

These are changes, mind you, that came about as result of the improvement plans required by NMPED.

 
 

Much of this stems from an email on Friday, May 4th, where ATF leadership writes:

"On Monday at 4:30pm, we have a Save Our Schools meeting to plan actions to help save Hawthorne Elementary … this invitation is for ATF members only. We will involve the larger community after we do the initial planning."

ATF leadership's approach is to determine the outcome they want first, then foist that self-interest onto parents and students. They are also fomenting for something to walk-out about. In recent emails they've written:

"Teachers Walking Out-what would it take here? –school closings, charters, evaluations…" and "Ellen talked with KUNM about the nationwide strikes and our context locally … we can have a conversation about this. What will be the issue that will galvanize APS teachers?"

Ellen and APS’s main contention with the MRI process - which is part of our federally mandated ESSA education plan - is that school letter grades are "flawed". So let's look at Hawthorne outside of the six consecutive Fs:

 
 

Only 1 in 4 of Hawthorne students can read on grade level. And 1 in 10 do math on grade level.

Well how does Hawthorne compare to similar schools? Taken alongside 128 schools across NM with similar demographics it doesn't look any better:

 
 

And, finally, how is Hawthorne doing for both high- and low-performing students? By now, you know the answer:

 
 

We must also bear in mind that the hard working teachers of Hawthorne are ensnared by the same inept leadership that allows schools to flounder for five years and more. I've met with many of these teachers. They are passionate, ready for a change, and frustrated by the lack of visionary leadership. 

Nationwide school turnaround efforts are always painful, but also commonplace and spurring much needed innovation. So, why do Albuquerque's education leaders insist on fighting a process aimed at turning around three of the lowest-performing schools in the entire country?

  • First, they don't like school grading. But, even without specific letter grades, the learning outcomes are dire. See above for proof. Plus, the fact Hawthorne is permitted to earn 6 Fs in a row shows no one is "abandoning" the school. How many Fs, then, before we parents and taxpayers have the right to demand something better?;
     
  • They thrive off of a constant fight against NMPED. District and ATF leadership make money from peddling paranoia, and have a problem for every solution offered;
     
  • They think this is a "push to charter schools." Which makes no sense outside of City Center. NMPED instructed APS to inform parents of ALL options, including nearby APS schools. And, if parents decide to stay enrolled at Hawthorne, that's their right. Schools should earn students, not trap them based on zip code;
     
  • APS continues to be inept at both running and overseeing schools. Admitting that Hawthorne needs immediate intervention also means conceding fault. Our schools should be governed by logic and common sense, not personal interests; and
     
  • ATF leadership is looking for something to fire up members about in a build up to similar walkouts we've seen in Arizona and Oklahoma. They are hoping for something bigger that makes them feel important. This, despite recent increases in salary and overall education spending.

APS struggles enough on its own teaching our students without outside forces seeking to turn this into trench warfare for the sake of personal gain. The time has come for ATF leadership to get out of the way of turning around these schools.

As the Journal recently asked, "At what point do the adults concerned with education in New Mexico come out of their fighters’ stances and truly focus on the students they should be serving?"


Let's Commit to Thinking Deeply About Improving Education

by Seth Saavedra │Tuesday, May 15th, 2018


Last week Harvard Business Review put up an article that piqued my curiosity: "What It Takes to Think Deeply About Complex Problems".

Penned by Tony Schwartz, CEO of The Energy Project, the summary reads:

The problems we’re facing often seem as intractable as they do complex. But as Albert Einstein observed, “We cannot solve our problems with the same level of thinking that created them.” So what does it take to increase the complexity of our thinking? To cultivate a more nuanced, spacious perspective, start by challenging your convictions.

Tony's solution involves three core practices:

  1. Forever challenge your convictions. Ask ourselves doubting, critical questions about the things we most believe to be true;

  2. Do the most challenging task first every day. Reserve unadulterated time to take on our most daunting problems; and

  3. Pay close attention to how you’re feeling. Monitor emotions and how they impact our thinking.

I'm drawn to this topic because almost nothing - aside from line cutters and loud talkers - bothers me more than shallow thinking. Particularly when the stakes are so high for students and educators. Policy makers and advocates, at the least, owe the field the benefits of honest, critical thinking.

This in large part explains my aversion to talking heads. If there is a field that rewards superficial problem solving more than politics, I've yet to find it. In elections years like this one, the vacuous one-liners are beyond egregious.

Education - inclusive of large portions of academia - possesses its own unique strain of empty verbosity. This includes some efforts over the past 25 years done in pursuit of reform. We see - or even author - a policy, recognize principles we hold as true, and fall right into the confirmation bias trap.

If a given approach affirms our existing worldview, then it must be right. Right?

 
 

In fact, the opposite is reality and a sure sign that an issue is in need of deeper thought. The better an education policy fits our strongest beliefs, the more skepticism required. And the more we're entrenched on an approach, the quicker we should be to reflect on why that's so.

Standing around self-flagellating about all the things we would've done differently isn't helpful. Instead, as I've touched on previously, we must harness new models to disrupt binary, "either-or" approaches. I've found the "limit and equilibrium" mental model pragmatic and helpful.

There are many bad ideas and policies, though not always as bad as we think or not bad for the reasons we'd thought. And the same is true for good policies. Simple truths are mythology. Occam - or Ockham if you're a pedant - and his Razor are aspirational lies we tell ourselves.

Simple answers make us feel safer, especially in disruptive and tumultuous times. But rather than certainty, modern leaders need to cultivate the capacity to see more ­— to deepen, widen, and lengthen their perspectives. Deepening depends on our willingness to challenge our blind spots, deeply held assumptions, and fixed beliefs. Widening means taking into account more perspectives ­— and stakeholders — in order to address any given problem from multiple vantage points. Lengthening requires focusing on not just the immediate consequences of a decision but also its likely impact over time.

As we ponder the next frontier of education evolutions, we'll be best served by thinking and reflecting on our staunchest beliefs - about Education and otherwise. The stronger we feel about something, the harder we must work to deepen, widen, and lengthen our underlying assumptions.

Part of the goal here is to reorient ourselves around problem solving. When we remain focused on solving problems - and disentangle from our sacred cows - we are more willing to change our minds and open them to new ideas. Both of which demand courage.

 
 

There's a specific bravery in changing perspectives and releasing beliefs. We don't want to appear weak or waffling. Yet, "I am wrong" remains a more powerful statement than "you are wrong". And saying it is as rare as it is necessary.

As Schwartz writes, "Managing complexity requires courage ­— the willingness to sit in the discomfort of uncertainty and let its rivers run through us." I work to conjure this courage and release myself from the pattens of thought I'm ensnared in at any moment.

As rhetoric around education heats up this election year, let's question what we "know" to be true and invite in new perspectives. Even from those we've marked as sworn enemies to all we hold dear.


Charter Schools Are A Vital Part of New Mexico's Future

by Bob Perls │Tuesday, February 20th, 2018


This post was originally delivered as a keynote speech to all attendees at a New Mexico Coalition of Charter Schools (NMCCS) conference on Friday, December 8th, 2017.


Public schools are one of the few remaining public institutions where people from every walk of life come together to mix and mingle.

Making our public schools stronger should be our top priority. Politicians, parents, teachers, and students. We all must commit to the best possible public education system. But, you have heard that before and not much has changed.

Strong public schools are the silver bullet to reduce crime, spur economic development, develop our tax base, increase voter engagement through well-informed citizens who care, and so much more.

So why can’t we do that? What stops New Mexico from having one of the best school systems in the nation?

Before I sound too critical, let me congratulate everyone who is already working hard to improve our next generation’s lives. As teachers, administrators, and policy makers, you demonstrate commitment to our kids.

As charter school supporters (I hope) you remain committed to something different for our kids and that makes all the difference, because different is good.

Kids are different, communities are different, cities are different, and the future will be different. Charter schools are different from traditional public schools and they are different amongst themselves. In fact, being different is what characterizes the charter school movement and being different is what summarizes what we all have in common in this vibrant movement.

Traditional public schools still function in the industrialized model of the 1950s where standardization was the goal. The same government buildings, same classrooms, same curriculum, same teacher training, same student evaluations, same teacher evaluations for all schools no matter what. Does anyone think that makes sense?

The charter school movement does not. Different is good, that is our motto.

Before I write too much about why charter schools can and should be the great political compromise between the Right and the Left and the model for all future school reform efforts, let’s review what the charter movement is about, how we got, here and why we are in the middle of a critical revolution.

As a State Representative in 1993 I wrote and passed the NM Charter School Act.

I am a product of Albuquerque Public Schools. I had good teachers and bad teachers; engaged teachers and teachers who were punching the time clock; innovative teachers and teachers who taught the same stuff the same way for 25 years. I found my refuge in the chorus and speech programs at Jefferson Middle and Highland High. Else I would have been miserable, bored, and unchallenged. With no place to belong.

With young kids in APS, I saw things had not changed that much in the ensuing 20 years or so. I thought there had to be a better way and on a trip to Disneyland in the early 1990s with my wife and kids, I read about the new charter schools in Minnesota and thought, "That's what we need in NM!"

Site-based management and budgeting, lots of waivers from useless regulation and bureaucracy, strict goals, and plans to achieve those goals. Plus, the ultimate in accountability: shut the schools down when they fail. So, I introduced the bill, worked to build a bipartisan support network, and - during a 60-day session - pushed it through with Governor King signing it.

This was a very basic charter school bill allowing for only five original conversion schools. Turquoise Trail Charter School is the only one still going. I was the President of the Governing Council in the late 90’s for another one, Taylor Middle School, where my oldest was going to school at the time.

In 1998 I served on the state charter school task force that redrafted my bill to expand and include new and start-up schools. That bill passed in 1999 and, with some changes, remains the legislation all NM charter schools operate under today.

What are charter schools?

First and foremost, they are public schools, despite the divisive rhetoric. They are incubators for new ideas. They are risk takers. They provide services to certain kids that other schools don’t and they include community members in ways that traditional public schools can’t. In short, charter schools are our hopes and dreams of what the entire public school system could be - and you are a part of it.

Charter schools are intended to be community-based schools run by a group of parents, teachers, and even students.

Not by administrators removed from the school site. Charters spell out in black and white how students learn, demonstrate that learning, and why. If they succeed, then they get their charter renewed. When they fail, they close.

When was the last time an underperforming traditional public school failing students got closed? God knows many are failing far too many kids. Ever? Charter Schools redefine what a school is, what great teaching is and what student involvement means.

My wife and I were two of the four co-founders of the Public Academy for Performing Arts (PAPA), a charter school in Albuquerque. From 2000-2002 I spent 20-30 hours a week of volunteer time helping move this idea of a school from a rough concept to drafting a charter, to presenting in front of APS to opening the doors.

The fact that PAPA is still going strong after 15 years is one of the most gratifying aspects of my life. Our original concept was for an integrated curriculum. Teach math through music. Teach physical education via dance. Explore history through the performing arts of that era.

Some of this happened and some did not. Innovation is hard when charters are accountable to their governing council, charter agreement, plus a school district with traditional rules and regulations. Inevitably, some innovation gets stifled.

Please defend against that encroachment.

Charter schools are accountable through their charter. Fulfilling what they promised to their chartering entity. When more layers of rules and regulations pile on our schools, it drowns our creativity and ties us up in knots. Just like traditional public schools.

We must fight the status quo that is failing most of our kids. Why?

Our public school system is failing us. Our graduation rates are abysmal. Most kids can’t read at grade level. Most NM universities spend the first two years bringing skills up to a 12th grade level. Most teachers are underpaid, under appreciated, and micro-managed.

Most charter schools pay more, micromanage less, teach better, teach more challenging students, don't cherry pick, take all comers, don’t get much money for the physical plant, and still get pummeled by the naysayers.

I say again: if traditional public schools close when they first failed kids, most public schools would have shuttered years ago. And many need to close. Now!

Yes, there are charter schools that have and continue to fail in NM. Yes, there are charter school founders and operators who are unethical, overpay themselves, and short-change their staff. Yes, there are charter schools with underperforming kids, in need of immediate change.

We are not a perfect movement, but the national data shows that charters provide a service that traditional public schools don’t. And with results at least equal to mainstream schools while serving a skewed, at-risk, needful population. Especially in New Mexico.

Now, let’s talk about the politics of education in New Mexico for a few minutes, because it is deeply frustrating to me and many education reform advocates.

The traditional Democrat orthodoxy believes that more money will solve our education problems. Pump more money in, better students come out.

The traditional Republican orthodoxy believes in introducing more privatization in public education. It focuses on school choice including vouchers and charter schools. They generally do not believe that a strong public school system is a priority due to a lack of trust in government’s ability to deliver quality services

My view is that competition for students between traditional and charter schools is good for all students. And teachers.

We should shutdown all failing public schools, whether traditional or charter. We should fire administrators who can’t improve local schools. All schools should embrace site-based management and budgeting. Just like charters.

We should remove power and money from the U.S. Department of Education, the State Department of Education, and local School Boards so that more money and authority is at the school site. Just like charter schools.

We should evaluate teachers based on their competency and results in the classroom. We should evaluate students based on a comprehensive portfolio that captures multiple talents.

We should counsel the bottom third of teachers out of the profession and double the salary for those remaining to attract higher quality candidates. The reason many charters have better teachers is because they pay more and they empower teachers to run the classroom, and even the school, the way they see fit.

Charter schools and teachers unions should be natural allies.

But they are not and that's an avoidable travesty. I would like to see the unions open their own charter schools and put their money where their mouth is to create the best schools in the nation and state.

The charter school movement is not about union busting. It is about creating an environment where collaborative management means there is no conflict between employees and management, because they are all the same thing and the same people.

I am against a voucher system to use public dollars to fund private schools because it undermines the charter school movement.

Any time someone uses vouchers and charter in the same sentence it hurts us. Charters are public schools. Vouchers pump public dollars into private and religious schools. Charters don’t take money away from public schools because they are public schools.

Charters can’t discriminate and must take all comers. Don’t let others confuse the two because it could be the undoing of our young but vibrant charter school movement. And opponents gleefully drive this wedge amongst us.

Again, charter schools should be the common ground where the political Left and Right come together to solve our education problem.

They demand accountability and efficiency while empowering teachers. They cut down on overhead while leaving more money for the classroom. They do away with the 1950s industrialized model of one-size-fits-all in favor of a nimble, diverse, community-based solution. When wholly embraced, charters give ammunition to those who believe we should spend more money on education.

You see, that is our perpetual log jam. The Left always wants more money without admitting they are funding a broken system. While the Right wants to cut education because they view it as a failed system.

Let the charter movement be our template for a new era in education reform.

One where we show we are responsible adults who deserve to be in the care of our next generation while also being the guardians of tax dollars well spent.

If that were the perception and the reality of education in New Mexico, we would have highly paid, highly motivated teachers, outstanding learners, and a new generation of New Mexicans able to drive our economy forward for the benefit of everyone.


Bob Perls - Board Member of NMCCS

Former State Representative Bob Perls wrote and passed New Mexico's original charter school act, served as President of Taylor Middle School governing council, and co-founded Public Academy for Performing Arts. He is a board member for the New Mexico Coalition of Charter Schools, founder of New Mexico Open Primaries, and is a serial entrepreneur in the healthcare technology field.


House Bill 180: The Urgent Need to Maximize Dollars to the Classroom

by Fred Nathan │Friday, February 2nd, 2018

Growing evidence suggests that increasing funding for education can improve student outcomes if the money is targeted to the classroom, rather than to administration.

Two good illustrations are Texico, a district of 560 students in eastern New Mexico, and Gadsden, a district of 13,478 students south of Las Cruces. Both districts are highlighted in a recent report by the nonpartisan think tank Think New Mexico, which noted that they consistently achieve strong student performance, even while educating a high percentage of students from low-income families. Both districts also spend a relatively high percentage of their budgets in the classroom.

Likewise, researchers at the nonpartisan Southwest Educational Development Laboratory studied 1,500 school districts in Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas, and New Mexico, and concluded that “student achievement is linked to spending patterns, and money matters when spent on instruction.” The study found that, in general, high-performing school districts spend a larger percentage of their budgets on instruction and a lower percentage on general administration than lower-performing districts. They also tend to employ fewer administrators.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, New Mexico spends an average of 57% of its education dollars on instruction. Another 13% goes to student and instructional support, which directly benefits students, but the remaining 30% of the education budget is spent on administrative costs. We can do better at getting dollars to the classroom.

That is precisely what House Bill 180 does. It sets ambitious but achievable targets for districts and charters to maximize spending in the classroom. The targets are voluntary, but the bill provides an incentive by allowing districts and charters that meet classroom spending targets to keep their cash reserves (even in times of shortage like 2017, when cash reserves were raided by the state).

Additionally, HB 180 broadly defines “classroom spending” to include not only instruction, but also instructional support (e.g., librarians), student support (e.g., counselors, nurses), and principals, since the research suggests that investment in these areas has a positive impact on student achievement.

HB 180 helps districts and charters reach classroom spending targets by eliminating unnecessary reporting burdens. Every year, districts and charters must submit at least 140 reports to the New Mexico Public Education Department (NMPED). That requires thousands of staff hours annually.

A better approach would be to eliminate those reports and move to an advanced data collection system. In 2011, Nevada implemented an advanced data collection system that reduced burdens on districts by allowing them to automatically upload the information they collect about things like student attendance, performance, demographics, to the state.

HB 180 directs New Mexico’s PED to implement a system like Nevada’s. Based on a 2017 report commissioned by the Thornburg Foundation, an advanced data collection system would save New Mexico school districts more than $46.5 million annually. Because the PED is already piloting an advanced data collection project, this is already in the budget and can be fully implemented at no additional cost to state taxpayers.

HB 180 was introduced by a bipartisan team of sponsors, including the Chair of the House Appropriations and Finance Committee, Patty Lundstrom (D-Gallup), and the ranking Republican on that committee, Representative Larry Larrañaga (R-Albuquerque), as well as multiple educators: Representatives Bobby Gonzales (D-Taos), former superintendent; George Dodge (D-Santa Rosa), retired teacher and principal; Tim Lewis (R-Albuquerque), teacher; Dennis Roch (R-Logan), superintendent; and Jim Smith (R-Sandia Park), teacher, among others.

 
 

Many factors play a role in determining student success, and moving more dollars to the classroom is not a magic bullet. However, it will make more money available for critical classroom needs that directly benefit students, like addressing the statewide teacher shortage, expanding access to proven programs like early childhood education and K-3 Plus, and improved pay for teachers and principals. We know it can be done, because many of New Mexico’s highest performing districts are already doing it.

Please contact your legislators and Governor Martinez and urge them to support HB 180. Learn more and email your elected official from Think New Mexico’s website at: www.thinknewmexico.org.


Fred Nathan - Think New Mexico

Fred is Executive Director of Think New Mexico, an independent, nonpartisan, results-
oriented think tank serving New Mexicans.